Joy at Work

I love being a fundraiser and I always say that, for me, fundraising isn’t a job but a calling.

So I got excited listening to Shankar Vedantam’s recent podcast, “How to Build a Better Job,” where he interviewed Amy Wrzesniewski, Ph.D., Professor of Organizational Behavior at the Yale School of Management. My ears perked up because I know not every fundraiser is happy in her job. And there lots of reasons for that. (Psst! I don’t believe that there is a perfect job – one that will make you ridiculously happy. After all, that comes from inside YOU.)

“People who see their work as a calling are significantly more satisfied with their jobs, they are significantly more satisfied with their lives,” notes Amy. “They are more engaged with what they’re doing and they tend to be better performers, regardless of what the work is.”

This is great news. Because many of us in the nonprofit space are passionate about what we do. And sometimes, passion isn’t enough.

My maternal grandfather, T. Thompson, with his logging truck in 1943.

My maternal grandfather, T. Thompson, with his logging truck in 1943.

The truth is that too many within the sector work (or have worked) in nonprofits that are dysfunctional, have poor decision-making, or lack appropriate human resource guidance – to disastrous consequences.

In other cases, sometimes fundraisers become discouraged and leave because they aren’t allowed to do the jobs for which they were hired, are unable to unleash their creativity, or are blocked from making any decisions, even within the job scope.

This is where Job Crafting can come into play.

Continue reading

Who Gave You Good Stewardship?

Hey fundraisers!

I want to hear about the most fabulous stewardship YOU have ever received from a nonprofit.

What – to a fundraiser – makes a thank you extra special?

What – for a fundraiser – clearly and emotionally shows the impact of a gift?

I asked two of my BFFs about their favorites – Shanon Doolittle and John Lepp. Both of them had told me about some amazing stewardship pieces that keep them giving and feeling great.

Shanon gets a big thanks from Amara.  

Shanon loves Amara because fostering kids – and giving them a forever home – are important to Shanon. She has been involved with Amara in a variety of ways, and she was their key speaker at their gala fundraiser last fall (and her ask helped them raise the most money ever!).

What she loves about it: The card was a child’s birthday card –  which fits perfectly with their mission. She loves the sentiment “it made me think of kids and all the kids who will now be touch and helped thanks to your leadership and involvement. Roar.”

What I love about it: I love this because the sentiment is simple and heartfelt. No list of all the wonderful things about Shanon. It drives home how Shanon is making a better life for kids. Can you imagine picking up a basic card from the store and changing it into a tear-jerker?

Continue reading

Why We Ms.Rupt

I want to tell you about a project that Rory Green and I have been working on for about a year.

When we get together and talk – about fundraising, about the state of our profession – there were times we agreed that there is something paradoxical about working at a non-profit organization.

Our causes seek to be change agents, yet we deal with archaic systems, power dynamics and bureaucracy.

Our causes fight for human dignity, yet we find ourselves degraded by peers or leaders.

Our causes support women, yet we often do little to support one another as female fundraisers.

Our causes advocate for a better world, yet we experience abuse and harassment in our workplaces.

We uncovered these truths over cups of tea and glasses of wine. We discussed quietly, looking to the root of the paradox. We questioned, we challenged each other. We wanted to go deeper into these issues.

We wanted to be agents of change in our organizations – and to empower others to be the same.

We needed to speak truth to power.

We sought to question, to cage rattle. To change, resist, surprise, challenge, heal. To disrupt. Together as women.

Continue reading

Are You a Treat?

2014-10-13 18.59.27

How do you greet the donor?

Halloween is my kind of season. The changing leaves, the crispness returning to the air, pumpkins in various stages of fright and delight greet you at every turn.

More than that, I’m a Halloween baby! And a fundraiser.

Let me share my six insights to how fundraisers can be more treat than trick for donors.

What do donors see when they meet you?

When you arrive for an appointment with a donor, does he see a smiling face, radiating warmth? Or does your donor avoid you like a black bad-luck cat? Or does the couple get the distinct impression of grasping, bony hands, outstretched toward their wallets?

I hope you have a friendly, relaxed demeanor, glowing from the inside with pride for your work as a fundraiser and for the work of your nonprofit. Even when meeting a donor for the first time, practice smiling before you meet and chase away any negative thoughts crowding your mind – the flat tire, the spat at the office, the morning tantrum at home. Be present and be focused on this discussion at this moment. This prospect or donor may be ready to entrust your charity with their valuable investment and dreams to create a better world – offer him or her the same thoughtful attention.

Your donor is #1!

Your donor is #1!

Ensure your donor feels like he is number one!

Not everyone keeps a whole bunch index finger candles around to remind them of this point, but here it is… as a fundraiser, you need to treat your donors as if they are ALL very special. Whether you are a major gifts officer with a portfolio of 100+, a manager overseeing a multi-channel direct response program, or the head honcho in a small shop, you need to tell those precious supporters how important they are to solving the problems that your nonprofit addresses.

So how to make all those donors feel special? Don’t just focus on the size of the gift the donor makes – although those donors need love too. The truth is that most charities have systems in place to treat big donors like a big deal. But you also have supporters making monthly commitments – are you remembering what trust they have given, reaching into their accounts or credit card every month? What are you doing to  thank them for their demonstrated loyalty? How about your long-time supporters who have been faithfully giving for 10, or 15 or even more than 25 years? They are true believers. Or the one who gave her first gift today? Pick five today. And five everyday. Pick up a pen and write a note or pick up the phone and make a call. Give an extra “thank you” from the heart.

Don’t hide behind a mask, be yourself.

Be authentic. You don’t need a costume to meet with a donor. Yes, donors may be wealthier (or stronger, smarter, wiser and older) than you are, but as Penelope Burk noted in her book, donors enjoy talking and working with interesting fundraisers (please cultivate outside interests!). Your donors want to change the world. They are looking for a partner.

Your donors enjoy meeting the real you. Yes, you may have to adjust your style a bit to ensure your donors are comfortable. But be authentic. Be a genuine representative of your organization, and the partnership will come more easily.

Designated gifts...

Designated gifts…

Designated gifts…. accept that the project makes the donor’s heart sing.

Being born on Halloween means that my grandma and aunts just LOVE buying me all sorts of serving wear in the shape of pumpkins. Or black cats in pumpkins. The picture on the right shows just some of the items – a soup tureen, salt and pepper shakers, a pitcher, teapots… and these are not even the real decorations (and I have boxes). These are not unlike the designated gifts you get… used for a specific purpose.

Donors are attracted to designated gifts for a few reasons… they are often projects where impact is easily measured. Or it simply aligns more strongly with their values. And sometimes we fundraisers, have a hard time talking about the total investment we need (aka Overhead). [Peter Drury shows how to discuss with your donors.] So thank those donors for completing that needed project. Then determine how you can better explain the overall funding you need… and earn their trust for unrestricted gifts further along in your relationship.

Share your candy.

After trick-or-treating, the first thing I wanted to do is to see what I got. Then divide it up into those candies I preferred and those I didn’t. Usually around that time, my mom came into my room and said something like, “You may have two tonight and then we will save some for the lunchbox and share the rest.” Panic would set in. It was MY candy! I would get gripped by a feeling of scarcity. I had worked so hard for it. No. In our house, the three children could keep some candy, save some to put in our lunches for school the next few weeks, and the rest was gathered for a snacks the family would share.

Now as a fundraiser, sometimes I see that same “I don’t want to share!” attitude on fundraising teams. Some people hog all the credit. Others choose to withhold information (which is very damaging to the team). In fact, as a fundraiser, even in a one-person shop, you are working on a team. Share. Share information, share your successes, share the credit for wins. We may track revenue up by source, but if we are only working for our own selves and not for the donors, we won’t be much of a success as an organization.

Finally, savor the moment, prepare for the next season.

Have a little party...

Yep, many of us will take any excuse for a party. And it’s easy to celebrate the successes. ONe place I worked we rang a bell when a gift of $10,000 or more came in. We had a quick huddle and learned about how it went. Then went back to our work.

But what about the failures? Celebrate them too. You learned something from that.

And then, get ready for what’s next. Because when you are a fundraiser, you have a lot on the go. One campaign is finishing, another is starting. Where are you in your cultivation, solicitation and stewardship cycle? Blow out the candle, have a slice and a laugh with your colleagues and then go!

Be a great fundraiser and have a Happy Halloween!

Fundraiser as Tugboat

I’m in Chicago meeting with my colleagues. We have a widely distributed team and we are looking toward year-end, adjusting metrics and planing for 2015. As it is for many fundraisers, this is intense work.

Last night I decompressed over some FaceTime with Rory Green. She’s a fundraiser too, savvy and upbeat and wise. Funny too (just check out FundraiserGrrl). I was talking to her about our big goals and trying to reach them.

“You know,” she said, “I believe a fundraiser can raise any amount of money.”

Yes. That IS true. A fundraiser can.

“As long as they are supported. And offered the appropriate resources.”

Also true. But I thought more about her first comment.

When we hung up I thought for a while about that. My thoughts turned back to home, to Vancouver and Seattle and the sea (which I love, I really love to live where I can smell the sea).

I thought of all the ships and how, as fundraisers, we are like the tugboats, guiding in the ships, the way fundraisers guide donors. They are the precious cargo, we simply help navigate. I quickly checked on Wikipedia and loved what they said:

“Tugboats are powerful for their size and strongly built, and some are ocean-going. Some tugboats serve as icebreakers or salvage boats.”

Well, isn’t that just like a fundraiser?

I’ve got my spyglass out and am looking at the different ships – some nearer and some on the horizon  – who are moving toward our shores. I’m making my plan for each one, tailoring the plans as December comes and then we turn the page and continue to the New Year. Sometimes I’ll have to salvage, sometimes I’ll have to fight to get to that donor. You will too. But remember, you CAN do it.

Just as a small tug boat guides even the largest ships, you will too.

Seattle Harbor

Seattle Harbor

%d bloggers like this: